Topics 2014

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December

The MAERSK EFFINGHAM arrives at the Port of Nagoya

Photo: The photo of the MAERSK EFFINGHAM taken from back side

On December 24, the container vessel MAERSK EFFINGHAM arrived at the Port of Nagoya (Tobishima Pier).

The MAERSK EFFINGHAM is one of the 13,000 TEU class container vessels that MAERSK operates on its Europe liner routes and is one of the biggest container vessels to call at Japanese ports (gross tonnage: 113,042 tons, length: 366.32 m).

The container vessels that operate on Europe, North America, and Asia liner routes today have grown considerably in size, to 18,000 TEU. This growing trend in vessel size is steadily progressing at the Port of Nagoya as well.

November

Nagoya Port Terminal Corporation has been designated “Special Port Operating Company”

Photo:Mr. Masaharu Ikuta, President of Nagoya Port Terminal Corporation, receives a certificate of designation from Mr. Akihiro Nishimura, Senior Vice-Minister of MLIT.

On November 12th, the Nagoya Port Terminal Corporation was designated a “Special Port Operating Company” by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport & Tourism (MLIT) under the Ports and Harbors Act of Japan
On this occasion, Mr. Masaharu Ikuta, President of Nagoya Port Terminal Corporation, received a certificate of designation from Mr. Akihiro Nishimura, Senior Vice-Minister of MLIT.

The “Port Operating Company System” was established by an amendment of the Ports and Harbors Act of Japan in 2011. With this system, a Port Operating Company can consolidate the operation of private container terminals that have been publicly authorized and operated by port authorities. Under the Ports and Harbors Act, only one Port Operating Company will be officially designated for the Ise-Bay area. As a special measure, however, a Special Port Operating Company is permitted to operate at each of the major ports in the Ise-Bay area (Ports of Nagoya and Yokkaichi) for the time being. The main benefits of the Special Port Operating Company designation are strengthening of the interest-free loan system and application of preferential tax measures.

The Nagoya Port Terminal Corporation (formerly the Nagoya Port Terminal Public Corporation) was established in December 2013. The Company is in charge of construction, management and operation of the international container terminals and a domestic ferry terminal at the Port of Nagoya.
To make the port operation more efficient, the Nagoya Port Terminal Company not only welcomed Mr. Ikuta (ex-Representative Director, President and ex-Chairman of Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd.) to incorporate private sector viewpoints but also issued new shares by third party allocation and other activities.

October

The MOL BRAVO, a Japanese over-10,000 TEU container vessel, arrives at the Port of Nagoya

Photo: The MOL BRAVO and gantry cranes

On October 15th, the MOL BRAVO, a Japanese over-10,000 TEU container vessel, arrived at the Port of Nagoya (Tobishima Pier).

The MOL BRAVO is the largest Japanese container vessel ever to call at the Port of Nagoya, and this was its second visit since she first called in July 2014. The MOL BRAVO has a wide beam capable of carrying 19 containers across.

The MOL BRAVO is operated on the European routes of the G6 Alliance. Currently, the majority of vessels in this service are of the 8,000-9,000 TEU class (MOL: 5 vessels, NYK: 6 vessels), but MOL is planning to switch all five of their vessels to this new type vessel by the spring of 2015.

G6 Alliance members: APL, Hapag-Lloyd, Hyundai Merchant Marine, Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Nippon Yusen Kaisha and Orient Overseas Container Line.

August

55th Anniversary of Sister Port Affiliation between the Ports of Los Angeles and Nagoya

On August 8th, the Ports of Los Angeles and Nagoya celebrated the 55th anniversary of their sister port affiliation at the Los Angeles. The Port of Los Angeles was the first sister port for the Port of Nagoya, with the two ports concluding their sister port affiliation in 1959.
From the Port of Nagoya, Takashi Kawamura, President of Nagoya Port Authority (and Mayor of the City of Nagoya), Takayuki Kondo, Executive Vice President and other members form the City of Nagoya Official Delegation attended the ceremony.

In his welcoming remarks at the ceremony, Mr. Gene Seroka, Executive Director of Port of Los Angeles, said “Over the past 55 years, the relationship between our ports has included many activities, such as environmental cooperation, staff training exchanges, and trade missions. This has been a strong relationship, with many people involved over the years, and we are looking forward to many more areas of mutual cooperation in the future.” Following this, Mr. Kawamura responded that “The Port of Los Angeles has always encouraged us through its deep consideration and strong friendship whenever disaster hit Japan.” He added, “For the sustainable development of both our ports, I sincerely hope that we will further enhance our relationship and overcome the new challenges we will face in the future.”

The ceremony was concluded with an exchange of commemorative gifts by Mr. Seroka and Ms. Harumi Ukai, Chairperson of Nagoya City Assembly.


Photo:Participants of the ceremony line up to be taken photos.
Mr. Gene Seroka (third from right), Mr. Takashi Kawamura (center), Mr. Takayuki Kondo (third from left) and staff members from the Port of Los Angeles and the City of Nagoya

June

Japan’s First Post-Panamax Car Carrier, Aries Leader, arrives at the Port of Nagoya

Photo: The Aries Leader of NYK is being moored.

On June 5th, the Aries Leader of NYK, the very first post-Panamax car carrier in Japan, arrived at the Port of Nagoya.

The Aries Leader is equipped with the latest energy-saving technologies such as an air-lubrication system(*1) and a hybrid turbocharger(*2) both of which have been installed on a car carrier for the first time, in addition to an electronically controlled engine and the use of water-emulsified fuel(*3) in the boiler.

With these technologies a significant reduction in carbon dioxide emissions is expected in comparison with existing large pure car carriers.

(*1) Air-lubrication system: An energy-saving technique that reduces the frictional resistance between a vessel's bottom and the seawater by supplying air to the vessel's bottom to generate bubbles
(*2) Hybrid turbocharger: Device to utilize the extra rotational power generated by the turbine for electric power generation
(*3) Water-emulsified fuel: A fuel compound composed of a mixture of water and heavy oil

April

First call of passenger cruise ship the Voyager of the Seas at the Port of Nagoya

On April 25th, the American cruise ship the Voyager of the Seas called at the Port of Nagoya. The Voyager of the Seas is the largest cruise ship (both in length and gross tonnage) to call at the Port of Nagoya since the Queen Elizabeth 2 (length: 293.5 m) in 1999 and the Sun Princess (gross tonnage: 77,000 tons) in 2013.

The height of the Voyager of the Seas is approximately 63 m above sea level. This is more than the maximum air draft (55 m) under the Meiko Triton Bridges, which must be passed to dock at the cruise terminal (Garden Pier) at the Port of Nagoya.
Therefore, the Voyager of the Seas docked at Kinjo Pier, which connects to the open seas without going under the bridges. Kinjo Pier usually functions as one of the major automobile exporting bases at the Port of Nagoya.

The Voyager of the Seas carried approximately 2,450 passengers, mainly from Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong and U.S.A. Several ceremonies took place to welcome the passengers and crew members on that day. In the evening, a farewell performance was held by the Nagoya Omotenashi Busho-Tai (modern samurai performers) before the Voyager of the Seas embarked for its next port of call, Tokyo.


Photo: Voyager of the Seas is docked at Kinjo Pier.
First call of the Voyager of the Seas

March

Reinforcing and thickening tide protection walls to withstand liquefaction

A careful look at the topside of the tide protection walls at the Port of Nagoya reveals different color layers on the sea side and land side.
The gray layer on the sea side is the original tide protection wall. The white layer on the land side is a newly constructed anti-liquefaction tide protection wall, reinforcement in concrete. This redesign gives the tide protection walls a thicker and more stable structure. Although the construction methods are different at each location, anti-liquefaction measures are being implemented throughout the Port of Nagoya.


Photo: The new and old tide protection walls are shown in the photo.

Actions to improve tide gates

The tide protection walls are also equipped with tide gates. To protect residential areas from flooding, these tide gates will be closed when high tides are predicted.
 


Photo:New Tide gate and old one are compared.
(Action No. 1) Making gates more lightweighted (rebuilt by using aluminum) for quicker gate operation

Photo:The tide gate transformed into tide wall
(Action No. 2) Converting tide gates that are not in use to tide protection wall

February

First call of passenger cruise ship the Voyager at the Port of Nagoya

On February 6th, the British cruise ship Voyager called at the Port of Nagoya. The Voyager is an explorative cruise ship that travels to unique tourist sites such as Antarctica, Easter Island, Galapagos Islands and others.
It is owned by the British company "Voyages of Discovery". Her calls at Tokyo and then the Port of Nagoya were on her south-eastern Asia and India cruise course.

The Voyager was welcomed by many people waving hand flags of the Port of Nagoya and by a performance of Japanese drums and marimbas.
The outside temperature on that day was 3.9 degrees Celsius, the coldest day of this winter. Despite the cold, most of the passengers disembarked the ship and enjoyed walking around the port as well as optional tours that included visits to Nagoya Castle, Atsuta Shrine and other major sights. In the evening, a farewell performance was held by the Aichi Samurai Princess and the Voyager embarked for its next port of call, Kagoshima (Japan).


Photo: Voyager enter the Port of Nagoya with pilot boat.
First call of the Voyager at the Port of Nagoya
Photo: Aichi Samurai Princess wave their hands.
Farewell performance by Aichi Samurai Princess

January

Trade value of the Port of Nagoya ranks No. 1 in Japan for the fourth straight year

On January 28th, Nagoya Customs announced the provisional figures for 2013 and reported that the trade value of the Port of Nagoya was 16.3 trillion yen (+14.0% over the previous year), ranking No. 1 in Japan for the fourth straight year since 2010.
The export value was 11.6 trillion yen (+14.3% over the previous year). This puts the Port of Nagoya at the No. 1 rank for the second consecutive year among all air and sea ports in Japan for the first time as far back as data can be searched to 1979.
(2nd: Narita International Airport, 3rd: Port of Yokohama)

By major item, the export value for completed automobiles was 3.0 trillion yen (+9.3% over the previous year, No. 1) and that for automobile parts was 1.7 trillion yen (+21.5% over the previous year, No. 2). The export volume for completed automobiles was 1.5 million vehicles (-2.4% over the previous year), also No. 1 in Japan.

On the other hand, the import value was 5.3 trillion yen (+13.2% over the previous year). By major item, the import value for LNG, a raw material for electricity generation, was 802.6 billion yen (+7.0% over the previous year, No. 1) and that for wearables was 351.0 billion yen (+21.2% over the previous year, No. 2).

Among trading partners, China held the top position with a trade value of 3.4 trillion yen, followed by the U.S.A (2.2 trillion yen) and Thailand (1.5 trillion yen).

Despite Japan's largest-ever trade deficit (11.5 trillion yen), the Port of Nagoya generated a trade surplus of 5.8 trillion yen (+15.4% over the previous year) and retained the top position in Japan in trade surplus for sixteenth straight year, since 1998.

Trade Value of the Port of Nagoya (Unit: Billion yen)
 

Export Value

Import Value

Foreign Trade Values

Deduction

Value

11,062.8

5,251.0

16,313.7

5,811.8

Growth rate

+14.3%

+13.2%

+14.0%

+15.4%

Trade Value of the 5 Major Ports (Unit: Million yen)
  Export Value(Amount) Export Value(Rate) Import Value(Amount) Import Value(Rate) Foreign Trade Values(Amount) Foreign Trade Values(Rate) Deduction(Amount)
Nagoya

11,062,761

15.9%

5,250,980

6.5%

16,313,741

10.8%

5,811,781

Tokyo

5,474,010

7.8%

10,029,872

12.3%

15,503,882

10.3%

-4,555,863

Yokohama

6,749,794

9.7%

4,172,493

5.1%

10,922,287

7.2%

2,577,301

Kobe

5,216,429

7.5%

2,948,407

3.6%

8,164,836

5.4%

2,268,022

Osaka

3,009,747

4.3%

4,852,860

6.0%

7,862,607

5.2%

-1,843,113

5 Major Ports

31,512,741

45.2%

27,254,612

33.5%

58,767,353

38.9%

4,258,129

Japan All

69,787,657

100%

81,262,175

100%

151,049,831

100%

-11,474,518